Accessibility Statement

Accessibility statement for careers.sellafieldsite.co.uk

This website is run by Sellafield Ltd. We want as many people as possible to be able to use this website. For example, that means you should be able to:

  • change colours, contrast levels and fonts
  • zoom in up to 300% without the text spilling off the screen
  • navigate most of the website using just a keyboard
  • navigate most of the website using speech recognition software
  • listen to most of the website using a screen reader (including the most recent versions of JAWS, NVDA and VoiceOver)

We’ve also made the website text as simple as possible to understand.

AbilityNet has advice on making your device easier to use if you have a disability.

How accessible this website is

We know some parts of this website aren’t fully accessible. This list contains issues that are likely to most impact users of assistive technology:

  • Can’t use accordion items with keyboard
  • Can’t open the site navigation with keyboard
  • Focus ring not prominently visible
  • Skip link to main nav not working
  • Tab focus gets hidden in closed side nav
  • Accordion item headings do not announce themselves as ‘clickable’ on iOS VoiceOver
  • Collapsed accordion content is announced by desktop screen readers
  • Non-intuitive tab order on vacancies page
  • Images are missing a text alternative
  • Job table on vacancies page creates apparent keyboard trap
  • Job detail pages have confusing heading hierarchy
  • Some pages have multiple consecutive links with identical link text
  • iOS VoiceOver: can’t open main nav menu
  • iOS VoiceOver: can’t open main site search
  • iOS VoiceOver: carousel makes the homepage difficult to navigate
  • The homepage carousel advances automatically and has no controls to stop or pause it
  • Screen reader reads out more carousel slides than are rendered on screen
  • Tabbing through carousel focuses extra slides
  • Tabbing through carousel breaks page layout
  • Back to top button not focusable with keyboard
  • Links are difficult to identify visually
  • Missing H1 tag on most pages
  • Social media icons at bottom of blog post pages are hard to see
  • The social media links in blog article footers have no text inside them
  • There are some links with non-descriptive text
  • The search form input field has no label
  • Video embed iframes do not have a `title` attribute
  • Not easy to access search field using keyboard only
  • Text-only zoom at 200% breaks main nav layout at smaller screens
  • Text-only zoom at 200% does not increase the job results list as much as the rest of the page text

These issues are being actively looked at and are expected to be resolved by within 2021. A full list of the issues that our testing discovered is presented below, under the “Non-accessible content” heading.

What to do if you can’t access parts of this website

If you need information on this website in a different format like accessible PDF, large print, easy read, audio recording or braille:

  • email: [email protected]
  • call: (0)19467 28333 – please request to be put through to resourcing team.

We’ll consider your request and get back to you in 10 working days.

Reporting accessibility problems with this website

We’re always looking to improve the accessibility of this website. If you find any problems that aren’t listed on this page or think we’re not meeting accessibility requirements, contact:

Ross Gardner – Careers Website Manager – [email protected]

Enforcement procedure

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is responsible for enforcing the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (the ‘accessibility regulations’). If you’re not happy with how we respond to your complaint, contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS).

 Technical information about this website’s accessibility

Sellafield Ltd. is committed to making its website accessible, in accordance with the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018.

This website is not compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines version 2.1 AA standard. The non-accessible sections are listed below.

Non-accessible content

The content listed below is non-accessible for the following reasons.

Non-compliance with the accessibility regulations

The below issues are being actively reviewed and we intend to begin publishing fixes within 2021. Some issues may be dependent upon third-party functionality and may be unfixable. In those instances, this Accessibility Statement will be updated to reflect the updated findings.

Issue Title Issue Description WCAG 2.1 Level WCAG 2.1 Criteria Number WCAG 2.1 Criteria Title
iOS VoiceOver: carousel makes the homepage difficult to navigate The home page carousel presents duplicate slides to the screen reader. When navigating by headings with the iOS rotor the page moves horizontally to try and show them. This is not noticed by the user and so they cannot scroll the page to accurately find the rest of the page content.

The multiple repeated also headings make navigating the page difficult.

The carousel also auto-advances underneath the user’s finger. This means that the heading for one carousel item may get read out and, by the time the user moves their finger to the link or paragraph text, the content on the page has changed, and the new text doesn’t match the heading.

The pagination pips are not treated as interactive elements by iOS VoiceOver and can’t be activated.

A 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence
Back to top button not focusable with keyboard Can’t tab to the Back to top button under normal circumstances.
The page tab order puts the button immediately after the header. Since the button only appears when the user is scrolled down the page, it is never visible to be focused.
A 2.1.1 Keyboard
Link with non-descriptive text The link text “here” does not describe where the link will take the user. A 2.4.4 Link Purpose (In Context)
The search form input field has no label All form controls must have a label. Without an accessible label, screen reader users may not be able to determine what the field is for, and users of voice-activation software will not be able to speak the label text as a shortcut to focus the field. Ensure that all form controls are appropriately labelled. A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Links are difficult to identify visually Hyperlinks in body content are difficult to distinguish from the rest of the text.

The link colour is very similar to the body text colour and has no underline.

The visited link style is also the same as the unvisited link style.

Blog pages seem to be styled legibly but not the main site pages.

AA 1.4.1 Use of Color
Social media icons at bottom of blog post pages are hard to see Social media icons at bottom of blog post pages are too light and do not have enough contrast with the page background colour AA 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum)
Banner at top of page hides top of page on iOS VoiceOver scroll On iOS VoiceOver scrolling happens a whole page at a time. Because the sticky header floats over the top of the content, it means the top part of the page is not discoverable via iOS VoiceOver, where the user traces their finger to focus page elements. AA 3.2.3 Consistent Navigation
iOS VoiceOver: can’t open main nav menu Using iOS VoiceOver, the hamburger menu can’t be discovered or opened. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
iOS VoiceOver: can’t open main site search The magnifying glass is not recognised as an interactive element by iOS VoiceOver. It cannot be focused or activated. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
Screen reader reads out more slides than are rendered on screen When using a screen reader, the carousel content is read out repeatedly. Duplicates seem to be in the carousel. A 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence
Tabbing through carousel focuses extra slides The carousel has 3 items, but the user can tab through 6 items before exiting the carousel. A 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence
Can’t open the site navigation with keyboard Tabbing through the header takes you from the Search & Apply button straight into the content. The menu button is not focusable with keyboard. The only way to open the menus is via click. A 2.1.1 Keyboard
Tab focus gets lost in closed side nav Tabbing past the end of the main content focuses on the sidebar navigation, with the Graduates child pages shown.

Tabbing through these items allows focus to rest on hidden parts of the navigation under the Programme Areas.

Sighted keyboard users will see the focus disappear.

A 2.4.3 Focus Order
Menu icon is not a button A screen reader describes this element only as “Clickable” without giving any text information about it.

Assistive tech users will not know what this element does.

A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
When using a screen reader, main nav text “Menu” does nothing when activated A screen reader user would expect the word Menu to do something.

The next item is only announced as “Clickable”, making its function not obvious.

A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Focus ring not visible Tabbing through the page elements is made difficult as the currently focused element is not clearly highlighted. AA 2.4.7 Focus Visible
Skip link to main nav not working Selecting the Main Nav skip link appears to do nothing.

On pressing it, the body tag becomes the focused element.

A 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks
Not easy to access search field using keyboard only Tabbing to the Search button allow the user to activate it with a press of the enter key. The focus stays on the button. Tabbing does not focus the user on the search input field, however. You have to tab a few more times to reach it. On focus the search behaves as expected. A 2.4.3 Focus Order
Tabbing through carousel breaks page layout Tabbing through homepage scrolls to hidden carousel elements, breaking the view/layout. A 3.2.1 On Focus
The in-page links menu button is not recognised as an interactive element by iOS VoiceOver Attempting to set focus on the menu button for the in page nav on apply pages instead sets focus on the hidden first item in the menu.

This is confusing for users, for whom it feels like a random link that’s always on the page in the same place as they scroll.

A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Can’t use accordion items with keyboard The accordion items can’t be tabbed to and so cannot be opened if using a keyboard. A 2.1.1 Keyboard
Accordion item headings do not announce themselves as clickable on iOS VoiceOver When navigating a page with accordions using iOS VoiceOver the accordion headings are announced as headings only. No indication is given that they will reveal extra content on interaction. This means that the accordion content is not available to users of iOS VoiceOver. A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Non-intuitive tab order First tab press focuses on the “Back to List” button at the foot of the page.

It should instead focus the first skip link.

Tabbing through the application buttons return the user to the top of the page.

A 1.3.2 Meaningful Sequence
Job table creates apparent keyboard trap On page load the keyboard focus is forced into the table.
The table elements have positive tabindex attributes which prevent the tab focus from getting to the rest of the page.This means that keyboard users cannot focus on any of the main nav, side nav, footer nav or the introductory page text, without first having to tab through the browser UI.

Using the mouse to change focus to the rest of the page makes it difficult to find the results table again. It’s actually the very first element on the for the tab order and is before the skip links.

A 2.1.2 No Keyboard Trap
The social media links in the footer have no text inside them The text inside of a link informs the user of the purpose or destination of the link. Because this link has no text, users will not know what the link does or where it takes them when they activate the link. This poses problems for users of screen readers and voice dictation. A 2.4.4 Link Purpose (In Context)
Multiple consecutive links with identical link text Each call to action in this page has the same text “Learn More”.

Assistive tech allows users to filter just the links on the page. In this case they would just see a list where all the links say “Learn more”

Child pages of this page also exhibit this issue.

A 2.4.4 Link Purpose (In Context)
In body text, CSS underline on text has been detected that is not a link The text in this passage has been styled to display underlined but it is not a link. Underlined text on the web or on apps is universally accepted as signifying that the relevant text is a link. Applying underline to text that is not a link is likely to confuse many users, and especially people with cognitive impairments, learning disabilities or dyslexia. AA 3.2.4 Consistent Identification
Confusing heading levels The job details have the labels for job number, functional area, etc as heading level 4.
The last one is Posting date. The description body has headings at level 5 which makes them all appear to be a sub section of the posting date.This can make it difficult for screen readers to navigate the page.
A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
The apply link opens up in a new window/tab Opening new windows when users are not expecting it can make navigating back to previous pages difficult for some users of assistive technology. A 3.2.2 On Input
Table used for layout rather than structuring information Assistive technology will interpret this content as tabular data making the block difficult to understand. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
These headings are not structured in a hierarchical manner and/or missing H1 tag The heading structure of this page does not effectively communicate the structure of the content on it. Heading elements provide important benefits: they act as wayfinding cues for in-page navigation, they contribute to page content summaries, and they provide context to the content below them. To do so effectively, headings should follow the `<h1>` to `<h6>` hierarchy and they should not skip levels. Restructure the document’s heading order so it uses a clear, ordered, and intuitive hierarchy. Ensure there are no gaps between each numbered heading level and the next. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
The carousel advances automatically and has no controls to stop or pause it Animated content containing information may not give users enough time to read it. It can also distract from other content on the page A 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide
This link has a `title` attribute that is the same as the text inside the link This link is already labelled by its text. The equivalent `title` leads to unnecessary verbosity for assistive technologies and offers no benefits to users. A 2.4.4 Link Purpose (In Context)
An `<frame>` does not have a `title` attribute An `<frame>` element either has no `title` attribute, or a blank `title` attribute. When frames are used within a page (and do not contain the entire page content) they should always have a `title` to describe their content. Assistive technologies will announce the fact that the cursor is moving into a `<frame>`, and a descriptive `title` will give such users an overview of what the `<frame>` contains. Add the `title` attribute to any frames not hidden from users. The `title` content is exposed to assistive technologies, and lets users know they are in an `<frame>` and what that `<frame>`’s content is about.

Iframes without a title are difficult for users of assistive tech to understand. The user finds a “play” button without any context.

A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Opened main nav is not announced When using a screen reader to activate the main menu, the change in page state is not announced. A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
Text-only zoom at 200% breaks main nav layout at smaller screens When the browser is set to zoom text only, as opposed to magnifying the whole page, the layout for the main nav extends past the left and right sides of the page, making them unreadable.

Additionally the line height is large enough to make a single item look like it is multiple entries.

AA 1.4.4 Resize Text
Text-only zoom at 200% does not increase the job results list as much as the rest of the page text A TalentLink style rule is applying a 10px font-size after a certain zoom level, resetting the base of the magnification for text in the results table. AA 1.4.4 Resize Text
An image is missing a text alternative One or more images are missing a text alternative. Images without a text alternative often confuse users of assistive technologies. If you do not supply a text alternative, users who cannot see the image will not understand the meaning that the image is intended to convey. A 1.1.1 Non-text Content
Collapsed accordion content is read out When reading accordions, the headings are announced as clickable.

Activating them with keyboard while the screen reader is working expands and collapses the accordion item as expected.

When closed the content of the accordion is always read out.

This makes what’s visible on the page different from what the screen reader user experiences.

It also makes the clickable nature of the accordion heading confusing for screen reader users.

A 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions
This is an implicit table header The text in these table cells is visually styled to look like table headers instead of using proper table header markup with `<th>` elements. When data tables do not have appropriate structural headers and attributes, it may be more difficult for assistive technology users to navigate the table, and to understand the relationships between cells. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
This `id` is being used more than once This `id` attribute value “main” is being used more than once. Because this `id` is being used to reference a UI control, this can cause issues with assistive technologies because only the first reference will work. Each `id` attribute value must only be used once per page.

In this case there is very little detrimental effect due to the way the page is currently laid out.

A 4.1.1 Parsing
Carousel pagination controls are difficult to use The carousel pagination controls are difficult to see and are very close together.

This makes it awkward for users with vision impairments / motor difficulties to use.

AA 1.4.11 Non-text Contrast
Text-only zoom at 200% makes the nav menu close button difficult to use When the browser is set to zoom text only, the X for the menu close button deforms so that it no longer looks like an X. The hit area also shrinks making it awkward to press. AA 1.4.4 Resize Text
An `alt` attribute is applied to anchor tags, where `alt` is invalid The categories lists in the blog posts have anchor tags with an `alt` attribute however the `alt` attribute is not valid for anchors. Assistive technology users rely on alternate text to understand the meaning of content images. Applying an `alt` attribute to an element that should not have one makes the content in the `alt` attribute unavailable and may cause confusion among users. Remove the `alt` attribute and provide a different method for describing the element’s content. A 1.1.1 Non-text Content
A heading element is blank A heading element has no text within it.   Headings are an important wayfinding and page-level navigation mechanism for screen-reader users. A blank heading, like this one, is unnecessary and maybe even distracting. A 1.3.1 Info and Relationships
First item inside main content is navigation, not content When following the skip to content skip link the first thing that gets read out is the breadcrumbs. These can be quite long on some pages and stops users of assistive tech getting to the content quickly. A 2.4.1 Bypass Blocks
Screen reader reads out breadcrumb separators as “greater” When a screen reader is reading out the breadcrumbs the > symbols used to delimit the navigation levels is read out as “greater”. This may be confusing for some users. There is also no markup on them that denotes the list as navigation. A 4.1.2 Name, Role, Value
The `<legend>` is empty The `legend` is in use, but it is blank. This eliminates the usefulness of the `fieldset` for users of assistive technologies. The `legend` element is intended to function as a label for the `fieldset`. A 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions

Content that’s not within the scope of the accessibility regulations

The WCAG guidelines do not describe all issues that users of assistive technology may encounter. Our testers will sometimes experience an issue that does not cleanly fall into WCAG criteria. In these cases, we will record the issue and recommend fixes to address it.

The below issues are being actively reviewed and we intend to begin publishing fixes within 2021.

Issue Title Issue Description
iOS VoiceOver: combobox for phone number country codes has 238 items Selecting from a vast list like this is very awkward for VoiceOver users, as they can only scroll 1 item at a time.
This page contains long strings of text in all caps This element contains a long passage of text that is capitalized, either in the text itself or via CSS text-transform. Capitalized text can be very difficult to read for users with dyslexia.
Use of all caps in buttons Text in all caps can be difficult for some users to read.
Use of all caps in job title Text in all caps can be difficult for some users to read.
Use of all caps in table header row Text in all caps can be difficult for some users to read.
Use of italics in job straplines Text in italics can be difficult for some users to read.
Ellipsis is not announced Blog article snippets end with “[…]”.

This is not always announced by a screen reader and the narration seems to end mid-sentence then begin in a new heading.

How we tested this website

This website was last tested on 5 March 2021. The test was carried out by TMP (UK) Ltd.

All pages on the site were tested using a variety of tools, both manual and automated, as well as user-testing with assistive technology.

This statement was prepared on 8 March 2021. It was last updated on 9 March 2021.